Another year, another dubious showing for South Dakota on the list of states with the biggest gambling problems.

For the fourth straight year, the Mount Rushmore State is in the top three, checking in at number-two behind Nevada.

South Dakota was third last year and topped the list in 2020.

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WalletHub measured gambling in all 50 states using 21 key metrics before issuing their rankings, based on data from a number of sources, including the U.S. Census Bureau, American Gaming Association, National Council on Problem Gambling, North American Association of State and Provincial Lotteries, FBI, Google Ads, and Gamblers Anonymous.

MOST GAMBLING-ADDICTED STATES (WalletHub)

  1. Nevada
  2. South Dakota
  3. Montana
  4. Mississippi
  5. Oklahoma
  6. Louisiana
  7. New Jersey
  8. California
  9. West Virginia
  10. North Dakota

South Dakota ranked second in what WalletHub calls 'Gambling Friendlieness', which accounts for things like numbers of casinos and machines, as well as gambling revenues.

The state is tied with Nevada, North Dakota, and Oklahoma with the most casinos per capita and is also tied with Nevada, Montana, and Oklahoma with the most gaming machines per capita.

The state is number six in the Gambling Problem and Treatment' category, which factors in the percentage of adults with gambling disorders, the number of gambling counselors per capita, and the availability of gambling addiction treatment programs.

For the second year in a row, Utah is the least gambling-addicted state.

LEAST GAMBLING-ADDICTED STATES (WalletHub)

  1. Utah
  2. Alaska
  3. Maine
  4. Vermont
  5. Hawaii
  6. North Carolina
  7. Kentucky
  8. Nebraska
  9. Florida
  10. Alabama

Gambling addiction can lead to serious economic consequences.

U.S. consumers experience over $100 billion per year in total gambling losses, with men accounting for an average debt of between $55,000 and $90,000 while a female averages $15,000 in losses.

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