If 2022 has been anything it's been an increase on prices. Food, vehicles, gas, eating out...and the list just goes on for items that have seen a price increase this year. Might want to add this one to the list, especially if you're a homeowner; energy costs for heating the home this winter are going up. Like it or not winter is coming and with major increases predicted, it's better to be aware.

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According to the NEADA (National Energy Assistance Directors' Association) press release out last month,

Home Heating Costs Reach Highest Level in More than 10 Years. Families will Pay 17.8% More for Home Heating this Winter.

That's compared to last winter, and that is a MAJOR hike. Here in Minnesota where we experience winter months usually a little longer and harder than some, that can be of real concern to many. Now is the time to think on HOW you can save even a little bit! After seeing the usual advice like, turn your thermostat temp down, covering windows with plastic, replacing furnace filters, closing unused vents (which apparently you shouldn't do, but read more on that HERE) and so on and so forth, I came across a few creative ideas and wanted to share them with you just in case you had not heard them before.

  • Open and Close Your Drapes or Blinds

You may be somewhat commonly known, but for a newbie to the Minnesota harsh winters, a good idea is to let sunlight beam in during the day to help get extra heat for free. But at night or when you get home from work, close up those blinds to help keep that extra heat locked inside, best you can anyway!

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Photo by Denny Müller on Unsplash
Photo by Denny Müller on Unsplash
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  • Light a Candle, Watch & Learn

Here's a new one I learned from insurance group Geico that says;

Lighting a candle will result in a tiny smoke trail: if you see it being tugged in one direction of the room near doors or windows, you likely have an air leak that can be treated with caulk or another sealant. Be sure to blow out your candle before you exit the room, however - it's never a good idea to leave an open flame unattended.

 

Photo by Rebecca Peterson-Hall on Unsplash
Photo by Rebecca Peterson-Hall on Unsplash
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  • Rearrange Living Room Furniture

This too was a new one to me and made me think, is this going to fool me into thinking the place is warm or will this actually help? According to educu.org, it can help especially if the furniture is blocking off your heater. Having it blocked isn't going to help properly heat your room, plus moving your favorite chair away from a drafty window and to the warmer part of the living room won't make you as apt to want to turn up your heat more.

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Photo by Francesca Tosolini on Unsplash
Photo by Francesca Tosolini on Unsplash
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  • Change the Direction of Your Ceiling Fan

I know there are plenty of you probably saying, we already know this trick. But I am here to tell you there are plenty of new home owners out there who might not know this yet. so here's the trick as shared by amfam.com;

In the summer you want your ceiling fans to rotate counterclockwise for a cool breeze. But, in the winter you can push warm air down by having them rotate clockwise.

Simple, yet can be effective.

Photo by Jason Anderson on Unsplash
Photo by Jason Anderson on Unsplash
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  • Close the DOORS

I'm not talking about the obvious front door, garage door or any door that leads to the outside. Talking about your closet doors or even cabinets. As pricetocompare.com explains;

Cabinets and closets are often situated on exterior walls. Because these are the coldest walls in the house, closing cabinet and closet doors can create a barrier between the frigid outdoors and your home's cozy interior. This can help keep rooms like your kitchen or bathroom more comfortable and lessen the need to crank the heat.

Photo by Steve Johnson on Unsplash
Photo by Steve Johnson on Unsplash
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  • Energy Assistance Program

Last, but certainly not least. See if you are able to apply for the Energy Assistance Program here in Minnesota. Obviously, like everything there are certain requirements, but it's definitely worth checking out HERE and applying if you can!

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Keep reading to find out individual state records in alphabetical order.

 

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